Week 5 – Activity – Instagram

Layla Hadidi 

Sunday June 27, 2016

     This week we focused on the analysis of a modern day form of digital art — Instagram. Applications such as Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook and numerous others have allowed users to create personal profiles or galleries that include the ability to: post photos, videos, statues, hashtags, comments, likes and the list goes on. Individuals express through these forms while the world watches. Specific applications such as Instagram have extended its opportunities to businesses and artists as well. Companies are now able to market through their photos and see a direct response from the consumers through comments and likes. Artists are able to show their work to the world through a simple post, creating a higher influence through the messages behind each intricate piece.   

      Instagram is also valuable for its ease and practicality of networking with friends and family. We exercised this ability to network with our classmates by posting our own photos and checking out the posted work of the other students. After a single day I learned new characteristics about my classmates that intrigued me. Especially because this is an online course and we have only interact through online messaging, it can be difficult to get a real sense of what a person is like. Instagram — as well as other applications– has become a valuable way to getting to know someone. 

      Some of my classmates posts that caught my eye included Lisa Bernhauser and her sketch on, Sansa Stark, a character from the television series Game of Thrones. I actually keep thinking of Bernhauser’s sketch when I watch the show. She was able to create that almost uneasy, mysterious look that Sansa always has on her face. Another classmate, Kevin Alipour, posted a photo of a meal he prepared which happened to a traditional Persian dish — as one of my favorite dishes — consisting of grilled tomatoes and rack of lamb. He truly captured the powerful colors in the photo. 

Kevin Alipour, posted a photo of a meal he prepared which happened to a traditional Persian dish — as one of my favorite dishes — consisting of grilled tomatoes and rack of lamb.

Lisa Bernhauser and her sketch on, Sansa Stark, a character from the television series Game of Thrones.

      I typically use Instagram to post photos of different landscapes or beaches I visit. It’s similar to a blog in the sense that people often post about their daily personally lives and thoughts. I battled cancer a little over a year and would post updates throughout my chemotherapy and radiation treatments. I received a lot of support from friends, family and even strangers on my posts. It also led to me support other cancer fighters that I had never met in person. It shows how powerful these modern applications, like Instagram, can be. As an artist, Instagram is a way to be inspired or inspire other artist. 

Week 4: Artist of the Week — Francesca Woodman

 

“Woodman’s gift made her a talent. Her insight and drive made her a visionary. Her youth and beauty made her an idol. Her untimely death made her a legend. “

Francesca Woodman left her mark as a photographer with artwork that contains melancholy or even gothic tone that is expressed through color (or lack there of) and dimensions created from the lighting. She was exposed to art as a child because her parents were both artists. She studied at Boulder, Colorado and sometimes traveled to Rome where much of her work blossomed.

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Self portrait Francesca Woodman at age 13.

 

Even though here photos are black and white, you still see a lot of texture and dimensions. She was able to create ghost-like images by blurring lines and stretching shapes.562eb0a21400002b003c92f3.jpg Her photos are not intended to be froma specific moment of time but instead a blurred timeline. Also, nude and black and white photos have been a common combination in her photography. The artist uses black and white to take emphasis away from eroticism. I believe what defines a great piece of art work is when you are able to look at it and the art has the power to make the viewer feel the emotion that was used to create the art.  Woodman has over 10,00 prints that are not collected by her parents but as you flip through her work, an aura  of heaviness that keeps weighing you down. A darkness that creates a sense of mystery or even death.

With over 8oo photo published, this artist committed suicide at 22 years young. “Though she had few opportunities to show work during her life, Woodman has been the subject of numerous posthumous solo exhibitions, including at the Museum of Modern Art San Francisco, the Guggenheim Museum, and the Fondation Cartier, among others.”

 

 

 

 

Week 3 Artist of the Week: Lady Pink 

“Sandra Fabara, known as the “first lady of graffiti,” was the only girl in the burgeoning subway-bombing graffiti subculture of 1980–85, when her teenage work, under the name Lady Pink, could be seen throughout the city”

— Noteworthy graduates: Lady Pink, graffiti & fine artist. (2013, December 19).

            Inspiration began after watching the documentary ‘Bomb It’ about the history of the controversial art of graffiti. Director, Jon Reiss, exposes different perspectives of graffiti and how it has evolved over generations. Lady Pink, a featured female artist in the documentary stood out as she was one of the first women who played a significant role in graffiti and mural art work. Her journey began with a broken heart as she would tag her boyfriends name.

thOAYKTXIQShe started her art education at High School of Art and Design is a Career and Technical Education high school in Manhattan, New York City. Here she was exposed to graffiti art as young as the age of fifteen and eventually joining crew such as TC5 (The Cool 5) and TPA (The Public Animals) crews.

Sandra Fabara stands out from the other graffiti artists or muralist; she is known as the ‘first lady of graffiti’ by being the one of the only women duringthQUTTPYAE the 1980’s. She inspired me with her independent feminist personality. She describers her experience in an interview as a female in a male dominated world. “It was absolutely impossible…No women had much success breaking into the boys’ club. That’s just the nature of what the boys’ club are. Women are excluded, we couldn’t get into sports, positions of power, we were still struggling with all of that. It was a sign of the times that it was impossible. Women were not taken seriously at all.” She further explained her fast track to being famous due to being one of the only females. She inspires me to be a creative female artist a prove that you don’t have to a male to be successful in the graffiti/mural industry.

Week 4 Activity — Sunken City Graffiti

After two days, I was ready to buy some spray paints and practice tagging again. Only a 22 minute drive from Downtown Long Beach is unique cliff side landslide of a previous homes and bungalows from 1922. After attempting to build  luxurious homes along the Pacific coast, the land where the homes were built on  experienced a visible shift towards the ocean of about 11 inches every day. What is left are concrete slabs that are accessible by hoping over a few short fences — that’s right. This are is technically not a legal are but at the same time, it is not enforced. You will see lots of active graffiti artists though out the day who come and go while co workers above pay no attention.

view from the top of the cliff

As you head down a few hills towards the water, pick a slab you want to tag and begin.  I started with a black background and tagged with bright colors over it. I did try to sketch it out with paint on the canvas before I filled them in to give me a more precise perspective of how it would fill the space. While practicing, I learned that the speed of how quick you move the can or the angle you hold it can all affect the outcome of your lines. I did meet more artists out here. Several people ask for photos or videos of you while you paint. Random YouTube Video of Me that a fan posted on YouTube (click blue hyperlink).

first tag of the day

Week 3 Activity: Graffiti @Venice Beach

       Inspiration began after watching the documentary ‘Bomb It’ about the history of the controversial art of graffiti. Director, Jon Reiss, exposes different perspectives of graffiti and how it has evolved over generations. Lady Pink, a featured female artist in the documentary stood out as she was one of the first women who played a significant role in graffiti and mural art work. Her journey began with a broken heart when she was separated from her boyfriend and expressed her grief by bombing his name.

I could see myself in Lady Pink’s shoes when she told her story and was inspired by how she expressed her intense emotions through tagging. I got chance to attempt my first tag at Venice Beach, CA where you can find a series of designated, legal walls intended for the display of graffiti. Between the police station and the skatepark, you see severs active artists tagging their spot on the concrete.

As a beginner, I learned a lot my first day out. The use of contrasting colors, bold lettering, consistent lines and dimensions are some key characteristics to making your lettering stand out. Not only that, the brand or type of paint also makes a noticeable different in the quality of the color and overall image. I was to speak to some more experienced artists who were also out tagging. They were quick to recommend brands like Mimg_2941ontana for a quick solid cover or Ironlak for paint that won’t drip.

I learned about not only about the actually art but the artists and the culture that come with graffiting.

Here is the work of the artist, Bugs, tagging the name of a lost loved one AMER. Bugs has been a part of the graffiti game for 36 years. Immediately these experienced artist provided with me with helpful insight about paints and even gave me some tips for my paint cans.